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Show: September 1, 2013:

  • How do microbes, the microbiome, and overall nutrition affect our health?

  • View all topics for the week

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How do microbes, the microbiome, and overall nutrition affect our health?

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Air date: September 1, 2013

Hosts: Jeremy Shere, PhD, David Crabb, MD, Barbara Lewis

Men's & Women's Health Nutrition and Exercise Medical Edcuation
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Interview: Michael Pollan, food and environmental author.

George Weinstock, Ph.D., professor of genetics and professor of molecular microbiology at Washington University in St. Louis.

Lawrence Brandt, M.D., professor of medicine and surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Gus Schumacher, former U.S. undersecretary of agriculture.



The award-winning “Sound Medicine” announces a special program for Sept. 1, which focuses on the microbes that join human genes to make up the human microbiome. The following experts visited “Sound Medicine” to discuss the microbiome, microbes, and fecal transplants.

Food and environmental author Michael Pollan is a superorganism. He doesn’t have special powers, but he does possess communities of microbes living all over his body. Pollan explains that all of us are superorganisms because of the colonies of bacteria living inside and on our bodies.

George Weinstock, Ph.D., professor of genetics and professor of molecular microbiology at Washington University in St. Louis, shares the pathology behind why microbes can sometimes make us sick but also how they protect us and provide vital functions such as helping us absorb nutrients.

David Crabb, M.D., talks with Lawrence Brandt, M.D., professor of medicine and surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, about the ancient practice of using bacteria from transplanted intestinal microbiota to colonize the large intestine and replace damaged and/or inadequate bacteria already there -- and how it is returning as a medical therapy for treating c. difficile colitis and other diseases.

Gus Schumacher, former U.S. undersecretary of agriculture, is promoting healthy eating one community at a time. Proper nutrition plays an huge role in the overall health of individuals. Schumacher visits "Sound Medicine" to discuss his innovative ideas that contributed to the foundation of Wholesome Wave, a Connecticut-based organization that improves the access and affordability of locally grown produce to traditionally impoverished communities.

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